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TOWN OF HIGHLAND © 2018

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HIGHLAND IN THE NEWS

New video portal features  Highland businesses, attractions

HIGHLAND POLICE: BEWARE HOME IMPROVEMENT SCAMS

If you’re thinking your siding or roof could use a little TLC or that your landscaping needs more than a little pruning, you’re not alone.

 

Summer is prime time for whittling that honey-do list. The town applauds your efforts, but wants to keep you safe from scam artists who prey on residents who don’t know if their

furnace needs to be replaced or a contractor’s promise to waterproof the basement is legit.

 

“We hear from people who don’t realize someone is duping them until the scammers have taken the money and run,” Police Chief Pete Hojnicki said. “Legitimate contractors have town licenses. If you don’t know the person you are hiring,

contact the Building Department for a list of licensed contractors. A bit of preplanning can eliminate headaches down the road.”

Take a virtual tour of Highland with the town's new video profile.

 

After a warm welcome from Council President Bernie Zemen, visitors can take a spin through shopping, dining and attractions or learn more about Highland business, industry, education, recreation, parks, healthy living, housing, quality of life and community organizations.

BOUTIQUE HOTEL TO ANCHOR PREMIER PLANNED UNIT DEVELOPMENT

A pivotal project for 2018 got an early start.

 

Eager to begin work on his signature clinic, Veterinary Surgeon Claude Gendreau’s construction team installed underground utilities, foundation and walls before year’s end.

 

The $50 million plan – known as Cardinal Campus – is located along Main between Indianapolis and Prairie Avenue.

 

“When I look at properties, I look to see if my project can be a catalyst for

others,” Gendreau said. “I believe the plan for Highland will attract other

high-end development.”

 

The development will be constructed in phases, beginning with the veterinary surgery center.

 

“We’ve been talking about this for more than a year,” Councilman Bernie Zemen said. “This is a project like none other we’ve seen. It is excit-ing to see it moving forward.”

 

 

Highland’s Urban Forest Management Plan details how its 10,011 trees will be managed over the next 32 years, beginning in 2018. Click here to download a PDF of the plan, which includes a complete tree inventory report,  maintenance program, tree risk assessment, best practices and  more. 

URBAN FOREST MANAGEMENT PLAN DETAILS PLANS FOR TOWN'S 10,011 TREES