Come home to Highland!

TOWN OF HIGHLAND COPYRIGHT © 2017

HISTORY OF THE TOWN

FIRST SETTLERS

 

Highland was almost entirely under water before it was first settled in 1848. Only a high sand ridge stood above the water. People referred to this area as Highlands.

 

Pioneers Michael and Judith Johnston were Highland’s first settlers in 1847. The area began as mostly open farm land until the arrival of the railroad in 1880. Dutch farmers – such as tenant farmer John Jansen, his daughter Susie, and his parents standing near a load of onions at home on Carolina Street – came in the 1890s and contributed to the growth of the town, once the largest in the state. When the town was incorporated in 1910 there were 304 people. The most recent census showed a population of 23,546 in 2000.

HISTORICAL SOCIETY

Highland Historical Society

Lincoln Community Center

Rooms 108-109

Highland, IN 46322

 

Curator Sue Douthett

highlandhistory@sbcglobal.net

(219) 838-9935

CONTACT INFO

PRESERVING OUR PAST

 

Members of the Highland Historical Society consider it a labor of love to chronicle the town’s history – from the mid 1800’s to present day.

 

Led by Sue Douthett, the group works tirelessly to preserve Highland’s past for all us.

 

Members also volunteer to staff the Town Museum, which is located inside Lincoln Community Center. A treasure trove of artifacts and information, the museum is open from 10 a.m. to noon  Saturdays and by appointment.

 

Become a fan of the Highland Historical Society on Facebook – Highland, IN Historical Society –

as well as another local Facebook community devoted to Highland – Growing up in Highland, IN.

A LOOK BACK

HIGHLAND'S LEGACY

 

Nearly 20 years before Highland was incorporated, the rustic and sparsely populated area became an expansion site for kraut processing for the Libby, McNeil & Libby Company. By 1890, the town’s largest industry was a canner of processed cabbage grown by local Dutch farmers. Nature’s bounty would become Highland’s legacy. Crops, like cabbage, onions, other root vegetables, as well as summer delights like tomatoes, cucumbers and peppers, would help feed residents living in the bustling industrial cities to the north.